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Colposcopy Specialist

Adefris & Toppin Women’s Specialists, M.D.P.C.

OBGYNs located in Woodbury, MN

Abnormal results from a Pap test might alarm you, but it doesn’t mean you have a conclusive diagnosis of cervical cancer. A colposcopy is a minimally invasive procedure that helps your physician determine the cause of an abnormal Pap test. The skilled team at Adefris & Toppin Women’s Specialists, M.D.P.C., performs colposcopy procedures right in the clinic. To schedule a colposcopy consultation, call the clinic in Woodbury, Minnesota, today, or book online.

Colposcopy

What is a colposcopy?

A Pap test detects changes in the cells of your uterus that could indicate the presence of cervical cancer. Abnormal Pap test results don’t necessarily mean you have cancer, but they do indicate that cancer might be present.

A colposcopy is a procedure that allows your Adefris & Toppin Women’s Specialists physician to make an accurate diagnosis following a Pap test. The procedure uses an instrument called a colposcope, a slender tool that has a light and a magnifying lens attached to it. This tool helps your physician inspect the surface of your cervix for signs of abnormal growth.

If your physician does locate abnormal cervical cells during a colposcopy, they take a tiny tissue sample to send to a lab for analysis. The lab results can identify which condition has caused the abnormal growth to form.

Which conditions can a colposcopy identify?

The primary purpose of a colposcopy is to detect the presence of cervical cancer. However, a colposcopy can also provide a diagnosis for other conditions, such as:

  • Cervical inflammation (cervicitis)
  • Cervical bleeding
  • Genital warts
  • Benign polyps

A colposcopy may also help your physician determine the cause of unexplained pelvic pain.

What happens during a colposcopy procedure?

The caring and experienced team of physicians at Adefris & Toppin Women’s Specialists performs colposcopy procedures right in the office. Anesthesia isn’t needed for the procedure, but your physician might suggest that you take some ibuprofen before your colposcopy to prevent discomfort.  

During a colposcopy, you wear a hospital gown and lay down on a table with your feet in stirrups. Your physician places a sheet across your waist and then uses a speculum to open your vagina. 

Next, your physician applies a special dye to your cervix that makes abnormal tissue easier to detect. You might feel a slight burning sensation, but this subsides quickly.

Your physician then inserts the colposcope through your vaginal canal to examine your cervix. If they find abnormal cells, they quickly take a sample before removing the colposcope and speculum. Mild cramping and spotting may occur for a day or two after your colposcopy.

If you’ve had an abnormal Pap smear or you have concerns about cervical cancer, don’t hesitate to schedule a consultation at Adefris & Toppin Women’s Specialists. Call the office today or request an appointment online.